Senators/Party ListMay 24, 2007 11:03 am Batch 31

1 Legarda, Loren  11,954,349

2 Escudero, Chiz  11,718,078

3 Lacson, Ping  10,310,400

4 Villar, Manuel  9,869,284

5 Pangilinan, Kiko*  9,411,950

6 Aquino, Noynoy*  9,362,819

7 Angara, Edgardo  8,175,757

8 Honasan, Gringo  7,680,035

9 Cayetano, Alan Peter**  7,620,833

10 Arroyo, Joker  7,451,961

11 Trillanes, Antonio  7,312,125

12 Pimentel, Koko  7,173,060

13 Zubiri, Juan Miguel  6,913,134

14 Recto, Ralph  6,723,066

15 Defensor, Mike  6,350,407

16 Pichay, Prospero  6,320,570

17 Roco, Sonia  5,537,012

18 Montano, Cesar  5,110,840

19 Osmena, John  4,876,735

20 Sotto, Tito  4,679,440

21 Magsaysay, Vic  4,137,568

22 Coseteng, Nikki  3,487,698

23 Oreta, Tessie  2,750,593

24 Singson, Chavit  2,652,615

25 Gomez, Richard  1,800,789

26 Kiram, Jamalul  1,483,769

27 Chavez, Melchor  593,307

28 Paredes, Zosimo  546,972

29 Bautista, Martin  523,469

30 Cayetano, Joselito***  373,392

31 Sison, Adrian  310,688

32 Lozano, Oliver  291,694

33 Estrella, Antonio  262,939

34 Wood, Victor  252,583

35 Orpilla, Ed  170,457

36 Enciso, Ruben  141,864

37 Cantal, Felix  114,123

Party List
BAYAN MUNA 231,506

BUHAY 227,452

GABRIELA 171,530

APEC 146,135

CIBAC 141,823

A TEACHER 123,529

AKBAYAN 106,857

ABONO 106,031

AGAP 104,942

COOP-NATCCO

96,831

ARC 92,056

ANAKPAWIS 83,872

ABS 71,157

KAKUSA 68,212

BATAS 67,310

ALAGAD 64,677

FPJPM      55,826

ABA-AKO 54,246

AMIN 53,260 S

ENIOR CITIZENS 50,678

KABATAAN 50,137

BUTIL 47,876

AN WARAY 43,954

ABAKADA 43,243

VFP 42,615

COCOFED 40,549

ANAD 40,506

BANAT 38,344

ANAK 36,482

TUCP 35,631

UNI-MAD 34,217

ANG KASANGGA 33,988

AVE 33,296

: DIWA 32,879

AT 31,920

1-UTAK 31,022

ABANSE! PINAY 30,229

AGHAM 28,569

BANTAY 24,363

SUARA 24,328

YACAP 22,012

PM 21,081

ABC 20,577

AGBIAG! 20,268

ALIF 19,711

SANLAKAS 19,581

AKAPIN 19,350

APOI 19,199

PMAP 18,743

A SMILE 16,445

GRECON 14,901

PEP 14,855

AHON 14,759

AKSA 14,750

SB 14,488

BAGO 14,252

APO 13,965

SPI 13,813

ASAHAN MO 13,107

KALAHI 12,902

HAPI 11,995

ASSALAM 11,978  

VENDORS 11,929

BTM 11,485

AAPS 11,356

PBA 11,346

BANDILA 11,284

ASAP 11,196

BP 11,125

ANC 10,716

AMANG 10,597

BIYAYANG BUKID 10,424

BUKLOD FILIPINA 9,890

BABAE KA 9,859

ABA ILONGGO 9,693

NELFFI 9,480

BIGKIS 9,077

AANGAT KA PILIPINO 8,331

ABAY PARAK 8,058

AG 7,853

ADD 7,680

ADD-TRIBAL 7,357

AHONBAYAN 6,892

LYPAD 6,235

AGING PINOY 6,099

BAHANDI 5,957

ALMANA 5,739

KASAPI 5,475

UMDJ 5,446

AAWAS 3,683

AA-KASOSYO 3,345

ATS 3,237 SM 2,726

Party List

1 1-UTAK 2,476
2 AA-KASOSYO 210
3 AT 4,848
4 ABAKADA 8,897
5 ABANSE! PINAY 827
6 ABA ILONGGO 1,270
7 ABONO 2,581
8 ADD-TRIBAL 660
9 ADD 546
10 A TEACHER 25,497
11 ASAHAN MO 1,562
12 AGBIAG! 4,582
13 AGING PINOY 1,032
14 AGAP 3,597
15 AHON 3,611
16 AHONBAYAN 987
17 APOI 4,900
18 AKBAYAN 12,302
19 AKSA 1,229
20 ALAGAD 17,373
21 ABAY PARAK 366
22 ABC 3,568
23 ANAD 1,799
24 AAWAS 387
25 ANC 1,256
26 APO 1,094
27 ARC 20,609
28 VENDORS 1,576
29 AVE 11,852
30 ATS 442
31 ALMANA 515
32 AKAPIN 1,666
33 AGHAM 2,443
34 ASAP 993
35 ABA-AKO 5,548
36 AN WARAY 8,295
37 AMIN 3,400
38 ANAKPAWIS 15,702
39 BANDILA 11,444
40 AG 611
41 ALIF 1,170
42 A SMILE 2,571
43 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 973
44 ANAK 4,992
45 ABS 8,137
46 AMANG 1,311
47 ASSALAM 1,868
48 AAPS 1,183
49 APEC 38,204
50 BABAE KA 1,392
51 BAGO 24,315
52 BATAS 5,460
53 BT, 915
54 BAHANDI 1,822
55 BANAT 4,684
56 BAYAN MUNA 31,224
57 BIGKIS 1,332
58 BP 905
59 BIYAYANG BUKID 491
60 BUHAY 38,408
61 CIBAC 32,004
62 SENIOR CITIZENS 12,143
63 COCOFED 3,837
64 GRECON 1,267
65 COOP-NATCCO 33,016
66 DIWA 7,387
67 FPJPM 8,401
68 GABRIELA 25,600
69 HAPI 281
70 KABATAAN 8,785
71 BUKLOD FILIPINA 171
72 KALAHI 1,695
73 KAKUSA 4,135
74 ANG KASANGGA 18,284
75 KASAPI 258
76 BUTIL 13,457
77 NELFFI 3,383
78 PEP 294
79 PM 4,266
80 PMAP 1,263
81 PBA 1,077
82 SM 77
83 SANLAKAS 1,184
84 SPI 2,244
85 SUARA 3,611
86 SB 582
87 BANTAY 6,023
88 TUCP 2,013
89 UMDJ 262
90 UNI-MAD 7,318
91 VFP 7,718
92 YACAP 9,879
93 LYPAD 499

PARTYLIST CANVASS REPORT No. 5 (Page 1)

PARTYLIST CANVASS REPORT No. 5 (Page 1)
As of May 19, 2007 – 6:00 PM

1 1-UTAK 1,347
2 AA-KASOSYO 92
3 AT 1,780
4 ABAKADA 2,251
5 ABANSE! PINAY 448
6 ABA ILONGGO 912
7 ABONO 1,103
8 ADD-TRIBAL 201
9 ADD 262
10 A TEACHER 9,494
11 ASAHAN MO 767
12 AGBIAG! 1,026
13 AGING PINOY 844
14 AGAP 1,035
15 AHON 2,447
16 AHONBAYAN 400
17 APOI 3,231
18 AKBAYAN 5,925
19 AKSA 490
20 ALAGAD 16,832
21 ABAY PARAK 271
22 ABC 1,777
23 ANAD 472
24 AAWAS 72
25 ANC 409
26 APO 667
27 ARC 8,527
28 VENDORS 964
29 AVE 7,545
30 ATS 329
31 ALMANA 372
32 AKAPIN 665
33 AGHAM 822
34 ASAP 600
35 ABA-AKO 2,487
36 AN WARAY 1,691
37 AMIN 1,060
38 ANAKPAWIS 8,367
39 BANDILA 10,787
40 AG 233
41 ALIF 856
42 A SMILE 2,124
43 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 547
44 ANAK 1,393
45 ABS 291
46 AMANG 463
47 ASSALAM 843
48 AAPS 382
49 APEC 18,447
50 BABAE KA 804
51 BAGO 912
52 BATAS 3,084
53 BT, 353
54 BAHANDI 229
55 BANAT 623
56 BAYAN MUNA 14,101
57 BIGKIS 665
58 BP 99
59 BIYAYANG BUKID 302
60 BUHAY 25,599
61 CIBAC 19,059
62 SENIOR CITIZENS 6,409
63 COCOFED 403
64 GRECON 184
65 COOP-NATCCO 3,386
66 DIWA 3,200
67 FPJPM 6,562
68 GABRIELA 16,847
69 HAPI 112
70 KABATAAN 3,178
71 BUKLOD FILIPINA 113
72 KALAHI 1,071
73 KAKUSA 1,443
74 ANG KASANGGA 330
75 KASAPI 85
76 BUTIL 7,559
77 NELFFI 195
78 PEP 158
79 PM 2,267
80 PMAP 770
81 PBA 660
82 SM 46
83 SANLAKAS 672
84 SPI 399
85 SUARA 31
86 SB 119
87 BANTAY 3,158
88 TUCP 1,430
89 UMDJ 161
90 UNI-MAD 1,750
91 VFP 2,124
92 YACAP 1,382
93 LYPAD 157

Page 2

1 1-UTAK 1,347
2 AA-KASOSYO 92
3 AT 1,780
4 ABAKADA 2,251
5 ABANSE! PINAY 448
6 ABA ILONGGO 912
7 ABONO 1,103
8 ADD-TRIBAL 201
9 ADD 262
10 A TEACHER 9,494
11 ASAHAN MO 767
12 AGBIAG! 1,026
13 AGING PINOY 844
14 AGAP 1,035
15 AHON 2,447
16 AHONBAYAN 400
17 APOI 3,231
18 AKBAYAN 5,925
19 AKSA 490
20 ALAGAD 16,832
21 ABAY PARAK 271
22 ABC 1,777
23 ANAD 472
24 AAWAS 72
25 ANC 409
26 APO 667
27 ARC 8,527
28 VENDORS 964
29 AVE 7,545
30 ATS 329
31 ALMANA 372
32 AKAPIN 665
33 AGHAM 822
34 ASAP 600
35 ABA-AKO 2,487
36 AN WARAY 1,691
37 AMIN 1,060
38 ANAKPAWIS 8,367
39 BANDILA 10,787
40 AG 233
41 ALIF 856
42 A SMILE 2,124
43 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 547
44 ANAK 1,393
45 ABS 291
46 AMANG 463
47 ASSALAM 843
48 AAPS 382
49 APEC 18,447
50 BABAE KA 804
51 BAGO 912
52 BATAS 3,084
53 BT, 353
54 BAHANDI 229
55 BANAT 623
56 BAYAN MUNA 14,101
57 BIGKIS 665
58 BP 99
59 BIYAYANG BUKID 302
60 BUHAY 25,599
61 CIBAC 19,059
62 SENIOR CITIZENS 6,409
63 COCOFED 403
64 GRECON 184
65 COOP-NATCCO 3,386
66 DIWA 3,200
67 FPJPM 6,562
68 GABRIELA 16,847
69 HAPI 112
70 KABATAAN 3,178
71 BUKLOD FILIPINA 113
72 KALAHI 1,071
73 KAKUSA 1,443
74 ANG KASANGGA 330
75 KASAPI 85
76 BUTIL 7,559
77 NELFFI 195
78 PEP 158
79 PM 2,267
80 PMAP 770
81 PBA 660
82 SM 46
83 SANLAKAS 672
84 SPI 399
85 SUARA 31
86 SB 119
87 BANTAY 3,158
88 TUCP 1,430
89 UMDJ 161
90 UNI-MAD 1,750
91 VFP 2,124
92 YACAP 1,382
93 LYPAD 157

Party List

1 APOI 1,328
2 GABRIELA 849
3 CIBAC 682
4 BAYAN MUNA 635
5 ANAKPAWIS 473
6 AKBAYAN 448
7 YACAP 440
8 A TEACHER 308
9 APO 307
10 AGBIAG! 286
11 KALAHI 273
12 ABA ILONGGO 266
13 ABAKADA 253
14 AHON 224
15 ABA-AKO 220
16 A SMILE 206
17 SENIOR CITIZENS 187
18 FPJPM 178
19 ASAHAN MO 174
20 AGHAM 163
21 BANDILA 155
22 AT 150
23 AGAP 148
24 BUHAY 147
25 AMIN 136
26 ASAP 135
27 ALMANA 125
28 ABANSE! PINAY 119
29 UNI-MAD 110
30 AHONBAYAN 107
31 PMAP 103
32 AN WARAY 99
33 BUTIL 89
34 AKSA 86
35 BANTAY 79
36 ANAD 76
37 KABATAAN 75
38 COCOFED 70
39 AG 65
40 BATAS 64
41 AVE 63
42 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 55
43 ANAK 52
44 TUCP 52
45 AKAPIN 51
46 ADD-TRIBAL 50
47 PM 49
48 SANLAKAS 43
49 VENDORS 42
50 ALAGAD 41
51 BABAE KA 39
52 PBA 39
53 ASSALAM 38
54 UMDJ 38
55 LYPAD 38
56 1-UTAK 37
57 AGING PINOY 37
58 APEC 36
59 COOP-NATCCO 32
60 ABS 31
61 VFP 30
62 ABONO 29
63 AAPS 29
64 ADD 27
65 KAKUSA 26
66 ARC 25
67 SPI 25
68 BANAT 23
69 DIWA 22
70 ALIF 19
71 ABC 18
72 BAHANDI 18
73 PEP 18
74 ATS 16
75 AMANG 15
76 BT, 12
77 BUKLOD FILIPINA 11
78 BP 10
79 SUARA 10
80 ABAY PARAK 9
81 KASAPI 9
82 HAPI 8
83 NELFFI 7
84 AA-KASOSYO 6
85 BAGO 6
86 BIGKIS 6
87 BIYAYANG BUKID 6
88 SB 6
89 AAWAS 4
90 ANG KASANGGA 3
91 SM 3
92 ANC 2
93 GRECON 1

Maguindanao teacher appeals to gov’t to probe poll fraud

By Jolene Bulambot
Inquirer
Last updated 09:45pm (Mla time) 05/23/2007
CEBU CITY, Philippines — Fearing for her life, a teacher who acted as a member of a board of election inspectors (BEI) in a Maguindanao town has appealed to national government officials to investigate the massive electoral fraud committed in the province.

The alleged fraud gave the TEAM Unity senatorial bets a sweeping 12-0 victory.

Interviewed through her cellular phone on the program Arangkada aired over ABS-CBN-Cebu’s dyAB, the teacher, who identified herself as Bai, accused the local officials of the Commission on Elections (Comelec), the police and the military of collusion in committing electoral fraud.

During the interview, Bai reiterated no elections were held in Maguindanao since the teachers were ordered to fill up the ballots starting at 11 p.m. on the eve of the May 14 polls.

She said that representatives from the National Movement for Free Elections (Namfrel) were even prohibited from entering Shariff Aguak where she was supposed to serve during the elections.

Bai narrated that she even told Namfrel representatives not to go to Shariff Aguak since they would not be allowed to enter.

“If you go to Shariff Aguak, you have to be accompanied by soldiers from Manila as well as top officials of the military and the Comelec,” she said in Tagalog.

She alleged that the local Comelec and military officials were in cahoots with those involved in the fraud.

According to Bai, her life and those of other teachers are in danger but she feels she had no choice but to expose the fraud.

She said two other teachers were willing to corroborate her statement.

When asked whether they were paid for filling up the ballots, Bai said they were not paid and that they did it on the orders of Maguindanao Governor Andal Ampatuan.

She added that nobody paid her to make the disclosures. “I just wanted to speak the truth. I don’t know if they paid for the thumb marks because we were not allowed to meddle. The governor is very fierce (matapang),” Bai added.

Bai said the people in Maguindanao were uninformed about voting because, for the past elections, the ballots were filled up.

“We teachers fill these up. The people in Maguindanao do not have any knowledge of elections. Look at their fingers, there are no indelible ink,” she said.

On Election Day, Bai said nobody went to the polling precincts.

Bai told the program’s anchor that she refused on-camera interviews out of fear.

“We didn’t want to do it but we could not do anything because our lives are at stake,” she said.

Cebu town canvassing suspended as BoC chair collapses

By Jhunnex Napallacan
Inquirer
Last updated 08:24pm (Mla time) 05/23/2007
CEBU CITY, Philippines — The canvassing of election returns from Bogo town was temporarily stopped Wednesday morning when the special board of canvassers’ chairman collapsed due to high blood pressure.

Senior Superintendent Lani-O Nerez, Task Force Hope-Visayas chief, rushed Bohol election supervisor Veronico Petalcorin, the chairman of the special BoC for Bogo town, to the Visayas Community Medical Center at around 10:15 a.m., in a police car.

Petalcorin was already fine and could walk on his own when they arrived at the hospital, said Nerez, who heads the security at the vicinity of the Comelec-7 regional office located along Osmeña Boulevard, Cebu City.

Nerez said Petalcorin was conscious and just asked for a massage on his hands while inside the police car.

Cebu Provincial Election supervisor Lionel Marco Castillano, who also went to the hospital, said Petalcorin’s blood pressure shot up but normalized as of noon.

Castillano said Petalcorin was resting at the hospital, though there was no word yet how long he would stay there. “It could just be over-fatigue,” Castillano said when asked for the cause of Petalcorin’s illness.

Petalcorin and the two other BoC members, Negros Oriental acting election supervisor Eddie Aba and La Libertad election officer Roberto Remolano, worked overtime since Tuesday afternoon when the ballot boxes containing the ERs from Bogo were transferred from the Capitol to the Comelec 7 regional office.

The new board took over the canvassing when the previous board members decided to inhibit themselves from the process after they were threatened with a “citizen’s arrest” and accused of engaging in electoral sabotage by the lawyers of 4th district congressional aspirant Benhur Salimbangon.

The Bogo canvassing will be the deciding factor in the 4th district congressional race between Salimbangon, a former provincial board member, and outgoing Bogo Mayor Celestino “Tining” Martinez III.

Petalcorin, after taking over the canvassing, declared that the new board would not allow any dilatory tactics and would order the arrest of anyone who would try to disrupt the proceedings.

Comelec Commissioner Resurreccion Borra, who is the commissioner-in-charge for Central and Western Visayas, appointed Aba as the new chairman of the canvassing board because of Petalcorin’s health problem

In an interview over dyLA, Borra said the board could continue even if there were only two members left.

The new canvassing board would, among others, have to deal with the alleged three missing election returns and 15 election returns under protest because of lack of signatures and thumb marks and other minor problems.

Salimbangon, meanwhile, said he asked Cebu Archbishop Ricardo Cardinal Vidal, the president of the church-based election watchdog Cebu-Citizens’ Involvement and Maturation in People’s Empowerment and Liberation (C-Cimpel), to make available the 6th copy of the ERs from Bogo.

These ERs would help resolve any conflict arising from discrepancies in the election returns.

But Martinez said the 6th copy was not needed because there was no cheating or manipulation of the ERs in his town.

When the provincial board of canvassers suspended their canvassing because of the unfinished canvassing for Bogo town, Salimbangon had a lead of around 13,000 votes over Martinez.

However, Martinez said he expected to have a lead of 16,000 to 17,000 in his own town, erasing the 13,000 lead of Salimbangon in the whole district.

Namfrel exec found ‘cat paw marks’ on Lanao Sur ERs

The chairman of the National Citizens Movement for Free Elections in Marawi City exposed on Wednesday an alleged poll fraud in Lanao del Sur towns with some elections returns (ER) containing marks that looked like they did not come from humans but from cats.

Tignan nyo ang mga thumb marks maliliit, hinliliit yata ang ginamit nila o kaya pusa (Look at the thumb marks , they’re so small, maybe they used their pinkies or the paws of a cat in marking election returns)” Namfrel-Marawi chief Mama Palawan said, while he presented fraud-marred ER copies to reporters during a press briefing at La Salle Greenhill in San Juan.

Palawan also showed other ER copies to media, which he said contained double entries, where the votes are higher than the number of voters.

He claimed there are many incidents of poll fraud in Lanao del Sur province where “vote manipulation” is usually done through separating the counting of votes for local and national candidates.

Lawyer Nasser Marohomsalic, executive committee member of the Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting- Legal Network for Truthful Elections, also told reporters that not one voter at Punod village in the municipality of Poona Bayabao, Lanao del Sur chose a candidate from the opposition.

Marohomsalic showed to the media a copy of Election Return (ER) No. 8401610 indicting that all 220 votes from the village went to the 12 senatorial candidates of Team Unity.

He also showed other ER copies from the village with all the 220 voters choosing only one party list group – NELFI or Novelty for Enterpreneurship and Livelihood for Food, which according to Marohomsalic is a “never heard” organization in the province.

Poona Bayabao is a fifth class municipality in Lanao del Sur. It has a population of 17,390 people in 2,452 households based on the 2000 census. – Fidel Jimenez, GMANews.TV

16 groups ‘winning’ in party-list polls

Sixteen party-list groups are on track to getting into Congress, led by Buhay and Bayan Muna that could each get the maximum three seats, based on the Commission on Elections’ partial official tally as of 6:15 p.m, Wednesday.

Buhay (845,540 votes), backed by Mike Velarde of the Catholic evangelical group El Shaddai, was on top with 8.4 percent of 10,070,691 party-list votes counted. The militant Bayan Muna (691,011) followed with 6.86 percent. Both party-list groups could each get three seats in the House of Representatives.

Cibac (493,923) took 4.9 percent, which would give it two seats.

On track to winning a seat each are 13 party-list groups: Gabriela (399,921), 3.97 percent; APEC (389,547), 3.87 percent; A Teacher (345,235), 3.43 percent; Alagad (333,264), 3.31 percent; Abono (324,631), 3.22 percent; Butil (313,840), 3.12 percent; Akbayan (288,829), 2.87 percent; AGAP (278,779), 2.77 percent; Anakpawis (258,810), 2.57 percent; Batas (258,804), 2.57 percent; ARC (255,023), 2.53 percent; Coop-Natco (250,178), 2.48 percent; and An Waray (203,745), 2.02 percent.

A group that receives 6 percent or more of party-list votes gets three seats in the House of Representatives. A group with at least 4 percent gets two seats, and one with at least 2 percent gets one seat.

The Comelec partial tally also showed that 77 other accredited groups have not received the minimum 2 percent of party-list votes.

In addition to more than 200 Representatives voted at the district level, there can be a maximum of 50 party-list seats in the House, although only close to half are typically filled following elections. -Amita Legaspi, GMANews.TV

Gabriela is No. 1 in OAV Comelec canvass

The official tally of the Commission on Elections, sitting as the National Board of Canvassers, of the Certificates of Canvass of the overseas absentee votes showed five progressive groups critical of the Arroyo administration bagging more than 2% of the votes cast by Filipinos abroad.

Gabriela Women’s Party, a militant party-list organization that has an international network of migrant workers in most countries, topped the list with 9, 768, or 18. 79% of the total votes cast for party-list between April 14 and May 14.

Citizens’ Battle Against Corruption (Cibac), a group associated with the Jesus Is Lord (JIL) charismatic movement led by preacher Eddie Villanueva was a far second, obtaining 5, 316 votes, or 10. 23% of the votes cast by qualified Filipinos abroad. JIL and Cibac have overseas networks, too.

Akbay Pinoy OFW-National, Inc. , a little known group in the Philippines, placed third with 4, 825 votes, or 9. 28% of the overseas absentee votes cast. APO! is an organization perceived to be a ‘front’ of Malacanang in a bid to ensure control of the House of Representatives and foil an impeachment process against President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo in the 14th Congress.

Progressive groups Bayan Muna and Akbayan captured the 4th and 5th place, with 2, 732, or 5.26%, and 2, 337 or 4.7% of the votes, respectively.

Buhay Hayaang Yumabong (Buhay), a group identified with the El Shaddai charismatic movement of Mike Velarde, ranked 6th with 1, 807 votes, or 3.48%.

On the 7th place is Anakpawis, another militant group allied with activist labor organization Kilusang Mayo Uno, garnering 1, 561 votes, or 3%, while the ethnic ABA Ilonggo (Abante Ilonggo, Inc) ranked 8th with 1, 183 votes, or 2. 28%.

Rounding up were the group Yacap (You Against Corruption and Poverty) with 1, 176 votes, or 2. 26%, and Agbiag! (Agbiag Timpuyog Ilocano, Inc. getting 1, 165 votes, or 2. 24% of the overseas absentee votes cast.

CoCs canvassed

The poll body completed the canvassing of the votes from Filipinos abroad on Monday morning, but the final tabulation was released only early evening on Wednesday. On Tuesday morning, the Certificate of Canvass from Samoa, an island group in the South Pacific Ocean, was opened, but the lone registered voter there was not able to exercise his right to suffrage.

The last batch of overseas absentee votes canvassed on Monday morning came from London and Ireland.

On Sunday, the CoCs tallied came from East Timor, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), Denmark, Finland, Sweden, Norway, Lithuania, United States, Antigua, Barbados, Bermudas, Micronesia, Marshall Islands, and the Bahamas.

This year’s turnout for the Philippine mid-term elections was only at 15 percent of the 504, 122 registered absentee voters across the globe. From reports abroad, most Filipinos voters were reluctant to participate in the elections because of strong doubts on the credibility of the election process and amid heavy suspicions that election results would be rigged anyway.

The canvassers tabulated the absentee votes on Saturday from Myanmar, Kuwait, Kenya, Aruba, Venezuela, Trinidad and Tobago, and Saudi Arabia.

On Friday, the canvassers tabulated CoCs from Pakistan, Afghanistan, Germany, Russia, Kazakhstan, Canada, Brunei, Rome and Milan (Italy), Cuba, Chile, Brazil, Singapore, Qatar, Oman, Egypt, Israel, Argentina, Sudan, Abu Dhabi, Jordan, Iraq, Greece, South Africa, Lesotho.

On the first two days of canvassing on Wednesday and Thursday, the COCs tabulated came from Laos, Papua New Guinea, Cambodia, South Korea, Austria, Slovenia, Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, Palau, the Netherlands, Japan, India, Thailand, Bahrain, Switzerland, New Zealand, Cook Island, Fiji, Australia, Vietnam, Belgium, Bulgaria, Indonesia, Mexico, Iran, China, Romania, France, Monaco, Portugal, Taiwan, Hong Kong/Macau, Yemen, Cyprus, Ankara, Spain, Morocco, Malaysia, Bangladesh, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Libya, Lebanon and Nigeria, with Hong Kong giving the biggest number of votes of close to 20, 000.

No vote was cast in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Panama, Monaco, Mali, Algeria, Chad, Malta, Mauritania, Tunisia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Togo, Senegal and Samoa.

Senate’s Magic 12

In the senatorial race, the final tally of votes from overseas Filipinos showed eight candidates from the Genuine Opposition, three from the administration Team Unity and one independent making it to the winning circle of 12.

The Top 12 choices included six re-electionist senators ( Francis Pangilinan, Manuel Villar, Ralph Recto, Panfilo Lacson, Edgardo Angara and Joker Arroyo), three outgoing congressmen (Benigno Aquino III, Francis Escudero, and Alan Peter Cayetano), two first-term politicians (Aquilino Pimentel III and Sonia Roco), and one returning senator (Loren Legarda) to the 14th Congress.

Overseas Filipino voters gave Legarda 59, 151 votes, placing her on top of the list, followed by Pangilinan with 58, 854, and Aquino III with 48, 714 votes.

The official OAV tally showed Villar Jr. of GO on the fourth slot with 48, 628 votes; (5) Recto (TU) – 47, 692; (6) Lacson (GO) – 42, 011; (7) Escudero (GO) – 41, 645; (8) Cayetano (GO) – 37, 924; (9) Angara (TU) – 37, 810; (10) Pimentel III (GO) – 37, 093; (11) Arroyo (TU) – 36, 615; and, (12) Roco (GO) – 30, 670.

The first two days of the OAV canvassing had APO! on top of the party-list organizations obtaining the highest number of votes, but on the third day when votes from countries with the presence of progressive migrant workers came in, Gabriela, which has been supposed by Migrante International, consistently topped the tally.

Nominees

Gabriela’s top three nominees to the 14th Congress are incumbent Rep. Liza Maza, Luzviminda Ilagan and former Hong Kong overseas contract worker Flora Belinan. The group is an active participant in anti-government protests.

Second placer Cibac’s first three nominees are Joel Emmanuel Villanueva, Luis Lokin Jr. and lawyer Cinchona Gonzales. Joel Villanueva, son of the JIL leader, is on his third term as party-list congressman representing the anti-corruption group. He has been a staunch critic of the Arroyo administration.

The participation of APO! in this year’s party-list elections has become controversial following its inclusion in what progressive groups billed as the “Dirty Dozen” organizations allegedly fielded or supported financially by the administration to ensure that the opposition would not be able to corner at least one-third of the House of Representatives and foil yet another impeachment process against Mrs. Arroyo.

The top nominee of APO! is retired general Melchor P. Rosales, an appointee of Mrs. Arroyo as undersecretary of the Department of Interior and Local Government. It’s other nominees are Floyd Feraren, Adelaida Lazaro, Alexander Galura and Zenaida Toledo.

Bayan Muna will have two incumbent Reps. Satur Ocampo and Teodoro Casino for the first two seats and lawyer Neri Colmenares of the Counsel for the Defense of Liberties (Codal) if it garners at least six percent of the total votes cast for party-list organizations.

For Akbayan it’s top nominee is incumbent Rep. Risa Theresia Hontiveros-Baraquel, followed by Walden Bello, Enrico Dayanghirang, Byron Bocar and Vicente Fabe.

Buhay has two sets of five nominees each submitted to the Comelec. The first set has incumbent Rep. Hans Christian Seneres, Hermenegildo Dumlao, Antonio Bautista, Victor Pablo Trinidad and Eduardo Solangon Jr. The second set includes incumbent Rep. Rene M. Velarde (son of the El Shaddai leader), Ma. Carissa Coscolluela, William Irwin Tieng, Melchor Monsod, and Teresita Villarama.

Militant Anakpawis would have incumbent Reps. Crispin Beltran and Rafael Mariano on top of a list of 14 nominees submitted to the Comelec that also includes jeepney drivers’ federation leader Medardo Roda and government employees’ leader Ferdinand Gaite.

ABA Ilonggo has Aguinaldo Miravalles, Arturo Mejorada, Robert Doromal, Anecito Magbato and Rogelio Setubal.

Yacap’s nominees are Carol Jayne Lopez, Haron Omar, Ernesto Moya, Arnel Zapatos and Alexis Wayne Valdivia.

Agbiag will be represented by Marcelo Farinas, Samuel Tomas, Rogelio Mendoza, Ruth Joy Guinid and Alex Manalo.

A party-list group will have to get at least 2 percent of the votes cast in the party-list elections to be entitled to one seat at the House of Representatives. A group can have a maximum of three seats for at least 6% of the votes cast in the party-list elections.

Proposals in Congress to increase the number of seats for a party-list group at the House have not prospered.

Back-door entry

The party-list election is hotly contested among sectoral, or marginalized groups in civil society because it is a “back-door” entry to the House of Representatives.

Progressive party-list groups have accused the administration of fielding “Malacañang-organized groups” to ensure a hold on power in the House should these win, bastardizing the real spirit of the Party-list Law, but possibly foiling a third impeachment process against President Arroyo.

The militant Akbayan party-list group has claimed that there is a clear and present danger that the party-list elections will be sabotaged. It said that among the 93 party-list groups currently accredited by the Comelec are “fake” because and that these are Malacañang “fronts.”

For one, the Akbayan cited the Biyaheng Pinoy party-list group as having questionable integrity, having a brother of the Comelec chairman as one of its nominees.

Akbayan had asked the Comelec earlier to disqualify what it called as “Dirty Dozen” party-list groups for their questionable nature and links with the government, saying these groups must be subjected to a serious inquiry and scrutiny.

‘Dirty Dozen’

Apart from APO!, the 11 other party-list groups belonging to what had been tagged as Malacanang’s “dirty dozen” were: AKSA (Aksyon Sambayanan), Babae Ka (Babae Para sa Kaunlaran), Kasangga (Kasangga sa Kaunlaran, Inc), Kalahi (Advocates for Overseas Filipinos) which were considered as adjuncts of, or entities funded or assisted by, the government.

Bantay (True Marcos Loyalists) which had been disqualified by the Supreme Court’s Bagong Bayani OFW vs Comelec ruling is also sought to be stricken off the party-list voting list because it is allegedly a front organization of the Armed Forces of the Philippines.

Retired Army general Jovito Palparan is Bantay’s top nominee.

Banat (Barangay Association for National Advancement of Transparency) organized by Charter change advocate Raul Lambino was labeled as a recycled party-list which had already been disqualified by Comelec but was surprisingly allowed to apply for a new accreditation. Banat lost in two previous elections and did not participate in the 2001 elections, technically disqualifying it from this year’s race.

Lypad (Youth League for Peace Advancement) allegedly failed to submit its list of nominees to the Comelec and should therefore be barred from participating in the party-list elections. Lypad’s officers work for the Office of External Affairs in Malacanang.

Other groups the progressive Akbayan party-list wanted disqualified are Agbiag ((Agbiag! Timbuyog Ilocano, Inc.) whose top nominee, Marcelo T. Farinas II, is a presidential adviser; Aging Pinoy (Aging Filipino Organization, Inc.) , Biyaheng Pinoy (BP) whose second nominee, Arsenio Abalos, is a doctor-brother of Comelec chairman Benjamin Abalos, and UNI-MAD (United Movement Against Drugs) that allegedly has questionable links with government that merit serious inquiry.

From the local absentee voters comprising soldiers, teachers, policemen and election officers on poll duty on election day, bulk of the votes went to the anti-drug UNI-MAD and BANTAY, garnering 19, 684 and 10, 853 votes, or 58.15% and 32.06%, respectively, of the 36, 361 votes cast for party-list.

Aside from Palparan, Bantay’s other nominees are Ramon Y. Garcia, Benjamin Angeles, Alan Guevara and Agnes Reano while UNI-MAD has Teodoro Lim, Alphonsus Crucero, Enrique B. Galang, Antonio Rom III and Manuel Mendoza.

The only other party that obtained more than a thousand votes from the local absentee voters was ANAD ((Alliance for Nationalist and Democracy) that listed Pastor M. Alcover Jr., Ruben Platon, David Odilao Jr., Provo Antipasado and Domingo Balang as nominees- GMANews.TV

GMA News Research: 181 RP towns consistent poll hotspots

EDERIC EDER and BRENDA BARRIENTOS

05/22/2007 | 11:42 PM

GMA News Research 181 RP towns consistent poll hotspots’)+’&bodytext=’ + encodeURIComponent(‘GMA News Research finds 181 cities and towns in the country are consistent hotspots since 2001Hotspots are areas considered election areas of concern and election areas of immediate concern’),’del.icio.us’); return false;”>

On April 1, Freddie Boy Quidato, mayoral candidate in Placer, Masbate, and two of his supporters were walking on Sitio Bugtong at Cauayan village when a group of some 20 armed men sprayed them with bullets. Quidato survived the attack unhurt. His supporters, Tod Nonoy Duan and Toto Juanico, were not as lucky.

A few days later, national police records show that Alfredo Yuson, a supporter of another Masbate mayoral bet, allegedly killed in an ambush two supporters of a rival candidate.

Violence is not new in the province of Masbate. Its political history has left a trail of blood in recent years: Three Espinosas, all elected public officials, have been killed in over a decade. The Espinosas have been rulers of Masbate for almost half a century.

Police statistics show that election-related incidents have claimed at least 25 lives in Masbate since the 2001 polls. A recent GMA News Research study finds that all but three towns and cities in Masbate have been consistent hotspots in the last three elections.

Masbate, however, is not an isolated case. GMA News Research finds 181 cities and towns in the country are consistent hotspots since 2001. (see complete table)

Hotspots are areas considered election areas of concern (EAC) and election areas of immediate concern (EIAC). The police define EAIC as cities or municipalities where election-related violence are highly expected to occur. EAC are towns where election-related violence are likely to occur or where election-related offenses were committed during the previous elections.

consistent election hotspots

Eighteen of these towns are in Masbate: Arroyo, Baleno, Balud, Batuan, Cataingan, Cawayan, City Of Masbate, Claveria, Dimasalang, Mobo, Monreal, Palanas, Pio V. Corpuz (Limbuhan), Placer, San Fernando, San Jacinto, San Pascual, and Uson.

Meanwhile, Abra, province of killed Rep. Luis Bersamin, is another regular hotspot. Ten of its 27 towns are consistent hotspots. It was declared under the control of the Commission on Elections this year. In the 2004 elections, four towns in this province were also declared under Comelec control: Bangued, Danglas, La Paz and Tineg.

In Nueva Ecija, 17 out of 32 towns are hotspots. Jaen town, where violence also erupted and claimed lives this year, is among the 17.

Half of the towns in Lanao del Sur are also consistent hotspots in the national elections from 2001 to 2007. This year, elections failed to push through in 17 towns due to threats of violence.

In Cagayan, 16 out of 29 towns in are consistent hotspots.

Table 1. Consistent election hotspots
Municipality Province Region1
Bangued Abra CAR

2
Boliney Abra CAR

3
Danglas Abra CAR

4
Dolores Abra CAR

5
Lacub Abra CAR

6
Lagayan Abra CAR

7
Langiden Abra CAR

8
Malibcong Abra CAR

9
Tayum Abra CAR

10
Tubo Abra CAR

11
Trento Agusan Del Sur XIII

12
City Of Ligao Albay V

13
Jovellar Albay V

14
Libon Albay V

15
Pio Duran Albay V

16
Casiguran Aurora III

17
Dipaculao Aurora III

18
Sumisip Basilan ARMM

19
Batangas City Batangas IV-A

20
Tuy Batangas IV-A

21
Amulung Cagayan II

22
Buguey Cagayan II

23
Claveria Cagayan II

24
Enrile Cagayan II

25
Gattaran Cagayan II

26
Gonzaga Cagayan II

27
Iguig Cagayan II

28
Lal-Lo Cagayan II

29
Lasam Cagayan II

30
Peñablanca Cagayan II

31
Piat Cagayan II

32
Rizal Cagayan II

33
Santa Teresita Cagayan II

34
Santo Niño (Faire) Cagayan II

35
Tuao Cagayan II

36
Tuguegarao City Cagayan II

37
Jose Panganiban Camarines Norte V

38
Labo Camarines Norte V

39
San Lorenzo Ruiz (Imelda) Camarines Norte V

40
Santa Elena Camarines Norte V

41
Buhi Camarines Sur V

42
Sagnay Camarines Sur V

43
Mambajao Camiguin X

44
Bagamanoc Catanduanes V

45
Gigmoto Catanduanes V

46
Carmona Cavite IV-A

47
Maco Compostela Valley XI

48
Mawab Compostela Valley XI

49
New Corella Davao Del Norte XI

50
Talaingod Davao Del Norte XI

51
Don Marcelino Davao Del Sur XI

52
Baganga Davao Oriental XI

53
Caraga Davao Oriental XI

54
Governor Generoso Davao Oriental XI

55
Lupon Davao Oriental XI

56
Manay Davao Oriental XI

57
Mati Davao Oriental XI

58
San Isidro Davao Oriental XI

59
Tarragona Davao Oriental XI

60
Can-Avid Eastern Samar VIII

61
Dingras Ilocos Norte I

62
Laoag City Ilocos Norte I

63
Cabugao Ilocos Sur I

64
Alicia Isabela II

65
Angadanan Isabela II

66
Delfin Albano (Magsaysay) Isabela II

67
Ilagan Isabela II

68
Mallig Isabela II

69
San Pablo Isabela II

70
Lubuagan Kalinga CAR

71
Pasil Kalinga CAR

72
Pinukpuk Kalinga CAR

73
Tanudan Kalinga CAR

74
Tinglayan Kalinga CAR

75
Kauswagan Lanao Del Norte X

76
Munai Lanao Del Norte X

77
Bacolod-Kalawi (Bacolod Grande) Lanao Del Sur ARMM

78
Balabagan Lanao Del Sur ARMM

79
Bayang Lanao Del Sur ARMM

80
Binidayan Lanao Del Sur ARMM

81
Butig Lanao Del Sur ARMM

82
Calanogas Lanao Del Sur ARMM

83
Ganassi Lanao Del Sur ARMM

84
Kapai Lanao Del Sur ARMM

85
Lumba-Bayabao (Maguing) Lanao Del Sur ARMM

86
Madamba Lanao Del Sur ARMM

87
Malabang Lanao Del Sur ARMM

88
Masiu Lanao Del Sur ARMM

89
Mulondo Lanao Del Sur ARMM

90
Pagayawan Lanao Del Sur ARMM

91
Piagapo Lanao Del Sur ARMM

92
Poona Bayabao (Gata) Lanao Del Sur ARMM

93
Pualas Lanao Del Sur ARMM

94
Saguiaran Lanao Del Sur ARMM

95
Sultan Gumander Lanao Del Sur ARMM

96
Tugaya Lanao Del Sur ARMM

97
Sultan Kudarat (Nuling) Maguindanao ARMM

98
Aroroy Masbate V

99
Baleno Masbate V

100
Balud Masbate V

101
Batuan Masbate V

102
Cataingan Masbate V

103
Cawayan Masbate V

104
City Of Masbate Masbate V

105
Claveria Masbate V

106
Dimasalang Masbate V

107
Mobo Masbate V

108
Monreal Masbate V

109
Palanas Masbate V

110
Pio V. Corpuz (Limbuhan) Masbate V

111
Placer Masbate V

112
San Fernando Masbate V

113
San Jacinto Masbate V

114
San Pascual Masbate V

115
Uson Masbate V

116
Baliangao Misamis Occidental X

117
Clarin Misamis Occidental X

118
Sapang Dalaga Misamis Occidental X

119
Lagonglong Misamis Oriental X

120
Arakan North Cotabato XII

121
Banisilan North Cotabato XII

122
Carmen North Cotabato XII

123
Kabacan North Cotabato XII

124
Midsayap North Cotabato XII

125
M’lang North Cotabato XII

126
Pigkawayan North Cotabato XII

127
Pikit North Cotabato XII

128
Tulunan North Cotabato XII

129
Lope De Vega Northern Samar VIII

130
Silvino Lobos Northern Samar VIII

131
Cabanatuan City Nueva Ecija III

132
Carranglan Nueva Ecija III

133
Gabaldon (Bitulok & Sabani) Nueva Ecija III

134
Gapan Nueva Ecija III

135
General Mamerto Natividad Nueva Ecija III

136
Guimba Nueva Ecija III

137
Jaen Nueva Ecija III

138
Lupao Nueva Ecija III

139
Nampicuan Nueva Ecija III

140
Palayan City Nueva Ecija III

141
Pantabangan Nueva Ecija III

142
Quezon Nueva Ecija III

143
Rizal Nueva Ecija III

144
San Isidro Nueva Ecija III

145
San Jose City Nueva Ecija III

146
Santa Rosa Nueva Ecija III

147
Santo Domingo Nueva Ecija III

148
Calintaan Occidental Mindoro IV-B

149
Sablayan Occidental Mindoro IV-B

150
Sablayan Occidental Mindoro IV-B

151
Sablayan Occidental Mindoro IV-B

152
Santa Cruz Occidental Mindoro IV-B

153
Bansud Oriental Mindoro IV-B

154
Gloria Oriental Mindoro IV-B

155
San Carlos City Pangasinan I

156
Pagbilao Quezon IV-A

157
City Of Antipolo Rizal IV-A

158
Calbayog City Samar (Western Samar) VIII

159
Matuguinao Samar (Western Samar) VIII

160
San Jorge Samar (Western Samar) VIII

161
San Jose De Buan Samar (Western Samar) VIII

162
Santa Margarita Samar (Western Samar) VIII

163
Tarangnan Samar (Western Samar) VIII

164
Bacon Sorsogon V

165
Castilla Sorsogon V

166
City Of Sorsogon Sorsogon V

167
Matnog Sorsogon V

168
Santa Magdalena Sorsogon V

169
Columbio Sultan Kudarat XII

170
Siasi Sulu ARMM

171
Siasi Sulu ARMM

172
Lingig Surigao Del Sur XIII

173
La Paz Tarlac III

174
Kalawit Zamboanga Del Norte IX

175
La Libertad Zamboanga Del Norte IX

176
Sibuco Zamboanga Del Norte IX

177
Sirawai Zamboanga Del Norte IX

178
Dimataling Zamboanga Del Sur IX

179
Josefina Zamboanga Del Sur IX

180
Kumalarang Zamboanga Del Sur IX

181
Tabina Zamboanga Del Sur IX
Source: Philippine National Police, Commission on Elections
gmanews.tv

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.