Abalos brod’s ‘tricycle drivers’ top Basilan vote

Loretta Ann Rosales

By Christian V. Esguerra
Inquirer
Last updated 05:27am (Mla time) 05/25/2007

MANILA, Philippines — How can a Mandaluyong-based party-list group of tricycle drivers score big in Basilan?

 

Election watchdog Bantay RA 7941 and Akbayan party-list Rep. Loretta Ann Rosales asked the question Thursday upon learning that Biyaheng Pinoy, headed by the brother of Commission on Elections Chair Benjamin Abalos Sr., garnered huge votes in at least two municipalities in Basilan province.

 

In Lantawan town, the tricycle drivers’ party-list garnered 1,480 votes and was ahead of Anak Mindanao, which enjoys a mass base in Basilan, but got only 1,403 votes, said Joven Diamante, legal counsel of Bantay RA 7941.

 

In Tipo-Tipo town, Biyaheng Pinoy was not far behind with 2,982 compared with Anak Mindanao’s 3,981, the lawyer said.

 

Diamante said he was in Basilan to monitor the canvassing of votes for party-list groups allegedly fronting for Malacañang and to represent a congressional candidate of Lakas-Christian Muslim Democrats party.

 

“It’s highly suspicious,” he told the Philippine Daily Inquirer Thursday in a phone interview from Basilan.

 

“Bastusan na talaga(They’ve lost all decency),” added Rosales, who first accused Biyaheng Pinoy of fronting for the Arroyo administration. The group is headed by Dr. Arsenio Abalos, elder brother of the Comelec chair.

 

A ‘Mr. Akbar’

 

Sought for comment, the elder Abalos who is the group’s second nominee, said there was nothing surprising or irregular about his group’s strong showing in Basilan because its fourth nominee was a certain “Mr. Akbar.”

 

“One of our nominees is from Basilan so that shouldn’t be a surprise,” he said, noting that his group had a membership of 1.8 million tricycle drivers and operators nationwide.

 

However, he didn’t say if the nominee was related to Basilan Gov. Wahab Akbar. Asked for the nominee’s complete name, Abalos said he didn’t know.

 

“He doesn’t know his group’s nominees? Then how were they chosen? What kind of group are they?” Rosales asked.

 

Diamante said Abalos and his group could just be “using that person (Mr. Akbar) to justify their statistically improbable votes.”

 

More votes than voters

 

Besides Biyaheng Pinoy’s strong showing in Basilan, Diamante’s group also questioned the alleged discrepancies in the number of votes cast and the number of votes tallied in certain towns in the province.

 

In Ungkaya Pukan town, where only 5,816 people voted, he said he tallied 5,941 votes for five party-list groups alone.

 

Diamante said Anak Mindanao got 1,350; Aangat Tayo, 2,299; Ang Laban ng Indiginong Filipino (ALIF), 1,137; Sulong! Barangay Movement, 471; You Against Corruption and Poverty (Yacap), 684.

 

In Tipo-Tipo, a town of only 8,409 registered voters, the lawyer said the number of votes tallied was 10,097.

 

Diamante said Anak Mindanao garnered 3,981; Biyaheng Pinoy, 2,982; Sulong! Barangay Movement, 1,134; Yacap, 1,120; and Novelty Entrepreneurship and Livelihood for Food Inc. (NELFFI), 880.

 

He noted that he had consolidated the votes for only four to five party-list groups when the total number of organizations gunning for congressional seats was 93.

Why wholesale fraud thrives in Muslim Mindanao

By Volt Contreras, Nikko Dizon
Inquirer
Last updated 06:49pm (Mla time) 05/24/2007
MANILA, Philippines–In some areas in Muslim Mindanao, local chiefs could issue orders for ballots to be filled up in behalf of entire villages for political kingpins offering the highest bid.

The voters, meanwhile, would either be too scared to protest, too clannish to question their conspiring elders, or just too detached from the government to feel violated as citizens.

Exploit this Moro “culture” using poll-rigging machinations devised by the “Christian North,” and that might help explain why the South has historically been known as the main theater of fraud in Philippine elections.

A veteran election official, a poll watchdog and a Muslim reform advocate shared these views as reports of massive vote-buying, cheating, and violence in the May 14 elections have again emerged from at least two Southern provinces, Lanao del Sur and Maguindanao.

One poll watching official has become so wary of Lanao Sur’s notoriety, that he warned the Commission on Elections that holding special elections there this Saturday would give cheaters exactly the chance they wanted. (The special elections were called after the presence of armed forced disrupted polling in 13 towns in the province.)

The 100,000-plus votes up for grabs in the province, likely the last that will be canvassed, could spell victory or defeat for senatorial candidates fighting for the last three to four slots in the Magic 12, Bantay Eleksyon 2007 chair Ramon Casiple noted.
The special elections “precisely puts the province in a position to determine the last members of the Magic 12, and you can expect anyone in danger of falling out of the Magic 12 to be there” in Lanao, Casiple said.

He said any financier of vote-buying in Mindanao would cut deals primarily with the leaders of the dominant clan in a target area — and that clan pretty much extended to the mayors, the local police, the election inspectors, and the canvassers.

Clan elders can then set the “price” per vote according to the highest bidder, he said.

“It’s a moving target,” Casiple said. If the race goes neck and neck near the end of the canvassing, for example, a senatorial candidate hanging on at No. 13 may place a “bid” of P10,000 per vote but a lower-ranking bet may come up with a better offer of P25,000 per vote.

Election-rigging schemes, however, are mainly hatched in Manila and carried out by “operators” who only flock to Mindanao during election seasons, according to former Comelec Commissioner Mehol Sadain.

“It is wrong to say outright that cheating is done by Muslims; the operators from the Christian North are the ones who exploit the people’s ignorance, complacency and apathy,” said Sadain, a commissioner formerly in charge of Region IX.

“Ever since,” he conceded, “elections in Muslim provinces have been problematic because the people still do not have a real appreciation of the right to suffrage under a Western (-modelled) Constitution.”

There is also that element of “distrust” that can be traced back to when Moros fiercely resisted Spanish and American colonizers, both of whom employed native Christian troops to invade Muslim bastions, according to Sadain.

For these segments of the Moro populace, “lineage” — not democratic exercises like elections — is still the prevailing principle for choosing leaders.

“They just would not care and voting for them is something mechanical that they just have to do, and it’s their lack of interest that makes it possible for the leaders and operators to ‘substitute’ their vote,” he said.

This can also help explain why the mostly Christian poll watching groups have found it difficult to penetrate Moro communities with voters’ education campaigns or find whistleblowers among the voters, he said.

And the few citizens duty-bound to question such conduct of elections — or actually the lack of it — were often met with a drawn gun or offered cash in exchange for their silence, Sadain said.

In a local election held in Basilan in 2005, for instance, teachers manning polling precincts in one school could only watch in terror as “15 barangay chairmen” barged in, “filled up all the ballots themselves,” then stuffed these in ballot boxes, he recalled.

In such situations, “fear is something you cannot just solve by holding automated elections,” Sadain wryly noted.

“It will really take a basic change in culture and values,” said Casiple said.

Muslim scholar Taja Basman conducted a study on how his native Lanao del Sur has gone down in history as the place “where the birds and the bees also vote” and where “children as young as 12 and 13 years old are registered by their parents in exchange for P1,000.”

The people’s extreme poverty would overcome any moral scruples about accepting money in exchange for their votes, while lack of infrastructure effectively kept elections out of Comelec control especially in the hinterlands, he said.

But immediate solutions — or deterrents in time for future elections — can be put in place, said Basman, president of the Philippine Islamic Center for Moderate Muslims and of the Mindanao Research Institute.

He suggested that elections be held in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao ahead of the rest of the country, the way it is done for overseas and local absentee voters.

A purge of shady election officials in the local level can also be initiated by focusing the so-called “lifestyle check” on these individuals after an election, Basman said.

But then, he said, real change and empowerment may still need to start from the voters themselves: Taught for generations to believe that “might is right” and be subservient to their powerful leaders, “hopefully one day they will come to their senses.”

Comelec defers canvass of votes from North Cotabato

By Lira Dalangin-Fernandez
INQUIRER.net
Last updated 07:46pm (Mla time) 05/24/2007
MANILA, Philippines — Discrepancies in the figures between the municipal and city certificates of canvass (CoC) and the statement of votes (SoV) per municipality prompted the Commission on Elections (Comelec), sitting en banc as canvassing board, to defer the canvassing of votes in the province of North Cotabato until Tuesday next week.

Comelec chairman Benjamin Abalos ordered all members of the Provincial Board of Canvasser to appear before the canvassing board and explain the discrepancy.

Lawyer Laila de Lima noted a “very big difference” in the figures in the city CoC of Kidapawan City as against the statement of votes per municipality based on the copy of the dominant minority party.

For instance, De Lima said that in the city COC, Edgardo Angara got 15,362, while in the SoV per municipality, his votes were 37,960. Benigno Aquino III received 24,524 votes in the city CoC and 25,220 in the SoV per municipality.

Joker Arroyo got 12,023 in the city CoC and 34,920 in the SoV per municipality. Martin Bautista got 971 votes in the city CoC, and ) votes in the SoV per municipality.

Of North Cotabato’s over 500,000 registered voters, 384,411 cast their votes in the midterm polls.

‘Lady with guts’ sent to Mindanao

By Nikko Dizon, Inquirer Mindanao
Mindanao Bureau
Last updated 03:08am (Mla time) 05/24/2007
MANILA, Philippines — The Commission on Elections Wednesday placed the violence-wracked province of Shariff Kabunsuan in Mindanao under its control, and announced it was sending “a lady with guts” to the area to count the votes after two other officials refused the job, fearing for their lives.

The poll body appointed Josllyn de Mesa, one of the senior lawyers at the Comelec’s law department, as new chair of the Provincial Board of Canvassers (PBOC) to preside over the tabulation of votes.

De Mesa was the third lawyer to head the canvassing board at Shariff Kabunsuan — a province with a voting population of close to 200,000 — after the previous PBOC chair backed out “because of security considerations,” Election Commissioner Rene Sarmiento said at a press conference.

A second Comelec officer, based in Manila, was subsequently appointed to take over the canvassing but also refused the assignment.

Sarmiento did not give their names.

De Mesa is scheduled to go to Shariff Kabunsuan on Thursday to take charge of the canvassing, along with a composite team of Comelec lawyers.

She will be accompanied by Luzon-based regional directors Gregorio Lardizabal and Emmanuel Ignacio.

“No one [would] accept the position as head of the provincial board. [But] we have this lady with guts enough to accept the responsibility. It takes a woman to accept the awesome responsibility,” Sarmiento said.

He said the Comelec had placed Shariff Kabunsuan under its control to “ensure that [the canvassing] would go smoothly.”

He added that the poll body was prepared to call on the military to deploy more troops, particularly the Marines, “depending on the situation”.

The Comelec assumes jurisdiction over an entire province, including its administrative functions, when it is placed under the poll body’s control.

Limited control

But in the case of Shariff Kabunsuan, Sarmiento said he limited the Comelec’s control to the deployment of military troops in the province.

“Normally, we take over even the local administrative functions but because of too many concerns we’re handling now, we [limited control] to providing troop augmentation from the Armed Forces, not only the PNP (Philippine National Police),” Sarmiento told the Philippine Daily Inquirer, parent company of INQUIRER.net.

Battling for governor

Three politicians — incumbent Gov. Bimbo Sinsuat of Lakas-Kampi, former Sultan Kudarat Mayor Tocao Mastura of Kampi and former ARMM Gov. Zacaria Candao of the United Opposition — are fighting for the post of governor.

While balloting was taking place on Election Day, two bomb explosions rocked Datu Udin Sinsuat town, wounding one civilian. In Sultan Kudarat town, a bomb explosion also wounded one civilian.

Hours later, after polling precincts closed, a bomb attack near the town hall of Sultan Kudarat, where canvassing of votes were being done, injured two people.

‘They are scared’

In Matanog town, tension between supporters of warring local politicians has also erupted.

A few days after the elections, unidentified armed men torched a portion of the town hall of Buldon. No casualties were reported.

Earlier this week, unidentified armed men fired an M-203 grenade launcher at Parang Elementary school where votes were being canvassed. No casualties were reported.

Comelec Chair Benjamin Abalos Sr. said that the commission en banc decided to place the province — which is part of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) — under its control upon the recommendation of Sarmiento, its commissioner in charge in the area.

“There has been complaints, particularly from the candidates [asking], why up to now the PBOC has not met. It’s because the one supposed to head the PBOC ay takot na takot [fearful] for his safety,” Abalos said.

Sarmiento said the first PBOC chair “did not take the responsibility” because of the “tension” among at least two gubernatorial candidates.

“There was apprehension … They [the candidates] are vigorously and passionately contending for the position,” Sarmiento said.

“We understand that some of the CoCs coming from the municipalities have already been forwarded to the PBOC. Unfortunately, there was no chairperson to convene the PBOC to canvass these,” Abalos said.

Showing ‘sovereignty’

The Comelec chair dismissed the idea of holding the canvassing of Shariff Kabunsuan votes in Manila.

“No. We stay put in Mindanao and do the canvassing there. Let me repeat, we have to show sovereignty there,” Abalos said.

The Comelec had to rely on might to enforce its will in another troubled area in ARMM — Lanao del Norte province.

A riot by protesters failed to deter police and election officers from moving the counting of votes cast in Iligan City to the provincial capitol in Tubod.

Supporters of Varf Belmonte, the opposition candidate for a House seat representing Iligan’s first district, tried to prevent the transfer of the certificates of canvass (CoCs), throwing stones at policemen, who broke up their rally.

Several protesters and policemen suffered cuts and bruises, according to Supt. Virgilio Ranes, Iligan police chief.

Belmonte has rallied his supporters against the transport of the CoCs to the provincial capitol, saying the results could be rigged in favor of his opponent, Gov. Imelda Dimaporo, a candidate of the Arroyo administration.

Belmonte said Dimaporo wielded undue influence in the provincial capitol, being the chief executive.

Partial results

Belmonte was leading when the CoCs were canvassed Wednesday.

Based on the partial, official results, Belmonte had 52,783 votes against Dimaporo’s 35,150 votes. The other congressional candidate, Angelique Badelles of Kampi, got 39,315 votes.

Comelec Commissioner Nicodemo Ferrer issued an order banning members of the Lanao del Norte provincial security unit from the canvassing site.

Instead, Ferrer asked the military and the police to secure the Sangguniang Panlalawigan building.

Election officer Chuvasco Caiña led the transport of ballot boxes containing the CoCs to Tubod.

The ballot boxes were heavily guarded by the members of the SWAT team, policemen from the regional command and 32 Infantry Battalion Philippine Army soldiers.

In Digos City, Davao del Sur Rep. Douglas Cagas and his supporters continued their protest, this time against the decision of Comelec provincial supervisor Maria Febes Barlaan to refer to the Manila head office a controversy involving the CoCs of the towns of Matanao, Bansalan, Sulop and Malita.

Rep. Claude Bautista, Cagas’ rival in the gubernatorial race, has petitioned the Comelec to exclude the CoCs from Matanao, Bansalan and Sulop.

Misuari defeated

Cagas, claiming there was an attempt to rig the Malita result in Bautista’s favor, also wanted the CoC from the town excluded from the canvass.

“It is no longer within my capacity to resolve those cases,” Barlaan said.

In Sulu, followers of Moro leader Nur Misuari continued calling on the Comelec to declare a failure of elections in the province following the defeat of their leader in the gubernatorial elections.

According to the Comelec count, Misuari had 19,121 votes while businessman Sakur Tan had 84,434 votes.

The total number of votes for Misuari was not even half the 53,096 votes that reelectionist Gov. Benjamin Loong got.

Misuari’s Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) cited widespread fraud and disenfranchisement of voters as reasons in asking the poll body to void the result of the elections in Sulu.

The Legal Network for Truthful Elections (Lente) also reported widespread cheating in the island-province. With reports from Richel Umel, Orlando Dinoy and Edwin Fernandez, Inquirer Mindanao

Senators/Party ListMay 24, 2007 11:03 am Batch 31

1 Legarda, Loren  11,954,349

2 Escudero, Chiz  11,718,078

3 Lacson, Ping  10,310,400

4 Villar, Manuel  9,869,284

5 Pangilinan, Kiko*  9,411,950

6 Aquino, Noynoy*  9,362,819

7 Angara, Edgardo  8,175,757

8 Honasan, Gringo  7,680,035

9 Cayetano, Alan Peter**  7,620,833

10 Arroyo, Joker  7,451,961

11 Trillanes, Antonio  7,312,125

12 Pimentel, Koko  7,173,060

13 Zubiri, Juan Miguel  6,913,134

14 Recto, Ralph  6,723,066

15 Defensor, Mike  6,350,407

16 Pichay, Prospero  6,320,570

17 Roco, Sonia  5,537,012

18 Montano, Cesar  5,110,840

19 Osmena, John  4,876,735

20 Sotto, Tito  4,679,440

21 Magsaysay, Vic  4,137,568

22 Coseteng, Nikki  3,487,698

23 Oreta, Tessie  2,750,593

24 Singson, Chavit  2,652,615

25 Gomez, Richard  1,800,789

26 Kiram, Jamalul  1,483,769

27 Chavez, Melchor  593,307

28 Paredes, Zosimo  546,972

29 Bautista, Martin  523,469

30 Cayetano, Joselito***  373,392

31 Sison, Adrian  310,688

32 Lozano, Oliver  291,694

33 Estrella, Antonio  262,939

34 Wood, Victor  252,583

35 Orpilla, Ed  170,457

36 Enciso, Ruben  141,864

37 Cantal, Felix  114,123

Party List
BAYAN MUNA 231,506

BUHAY 227,452

GABRIELA 171,530

APEC 146,135

CIBAC 141,823

A TEACHER 123,529

AKBAYAN 106,857

ABONO 106,031

AGAP 104,942

COOP-NATCCO

96,831

ARC 92,056

ANAKPAWIS 83,872

ABS 71,157

KAKUSA 68,212

BATAS 67,310

ALAGAD 64,677

FPJPM      55,826

ABA-AKO 54,246

AMIN 53,260 S

ENIOR CITIZENS 50,678

KABATAAN 50,137

BUTIL 47,876

AN WARAY 43,954

ABAKADA 43,243

VFP 42,615

COCOFED 40,549

ANAD 40,506

BANAT 38,344

ANAK 36,482

TUCP 35,631

UNI-MAD 34,217

ANG KASANGGA 33,988

AVE 33,296

: DIWA 32,879

AT 31,920

1-UTAK 31,022

ABANSE! PINAY 30,229

AGHAM 28,569

BANTAY 24,363

SUARA 24,328

YACAP 22,012

PM 21,081

ABC 20,577

AGBIAG! 20,268

ALIF 19,711

SANLAKAS 19,581

AKAPIN 19,350

APOI 19,199

PMAP 18,743

A SMILE 16,445

GRECON 14,901

PEP 14,855

AHON 14,759

AKSA 14,750

SB 14,488

BAGO 14,252

APO 13,965

SPI 13,813

ASAHAN MO 13,107

KALAHI 12,902

HAPI 11,995

ASSALAM 11,978  

VENDORS 11,929

BTM 11,485

AAPS 11,356

PBA 11,346

BANDILA 11,284

ASAP 11,196

BP 11,125

ANC 10,716

AMANG 10,597

BIYAYANG BUKID 10,424

BUKLOD FILIPINA 9,890

BABAE KA 9,859

ABA ILONGGO 9,693

NELFFI 9,480

BIGKIS 9,077

AANGAT KA PILIPINO 8,331

ABAY PARAK 8,058

AG 7,853

ADD 7,680

ADD-TRIBAL 7,357

AHONBAYAN 6,892

LYPAD 6,235

AGING PINOY 6,099

BAHANDI 5,957

ALMANA 5,739

KASAPI 5,475

UMDJ 5,446

AAWAS 3,683

AA-KASOSYO 3,345

ATS 3,237 SM 2,726

Party List

1 1-UTAK 2,476
2 AA-KASOSYO 210
3 AT 4,848
4 ABAKADA 8,897
5 ABANSE! PINAY 827
6 ABA ILONGGO 1,270
7 ABONO 2,581
8 ADD-TRIBAL 660
9 ADD 546
10 A TEACHER 25,497
11 ASAHAN MO 1,562
12 AGBIAG! 4,582
13 AGING PINOY 1,032
14 AGAP 3,597
15 AHON 3,611
16 AHONBAYAN 987
17 APOI 4,900
18 AKBAYAN 12,302
19 AKSA 1,229
20 ALAGAD 17,373
21 ABAY PARAK 366
22 ABC 3,568
23 ANAD 1,799
24 AAWAS 387
25 ANC 1,256
26 APO 1,094
27 ARC 20,609
28 VENDORS 1,576
29 AVE 11,852
30 ATS 442
31 ALMANA 515
32 AKAPIN 1,666
33 AGHAM 2,443
34 ASAP 993
35 ABA-AKO 5,548
36 AN WARAY 8,295
37 AMIN 3,400
38 ANAKPAWIS 15,702
39 BANDILA 11,444
40 AG 611
41 ALIF 1,170
42 A SMILE 2,571
43 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 973
44 ANAK 4,992
45 ABS 8,137
46 AMANG 1,311
47 ASSALAM 1,868
48 AAPS 1,183
49 APEC 38,204
50 BABAE KA 1,392
51 BAGO 24,315
52 BATAS 5,460
53 BT, 915
54 BAHANDI 1,822
55 BANAT 4,684
56 BAYAN MUNA 31,224
57 BIGKIS 1,332
58 BP 905
59 BIYAYANG BUKID 491
60 BUHAY 38,408
61 CIBAC 32,004
62 SENIOR CITIZENS 12,143
63 COCOFED 3,837
64 GRECON 1,267
65 COOP-NATCCO 33,016
66 DIWA 7,387
67 FPJPM 8,401
68 GABRIELA 25,600
69 HAPI 281
70 KABATAAN 8,785
71 BUKLOD FILIPINA 171
72 KALAHI 1,695
73 KAKUSA 4,135
74 ANG KASANGGA 18,284
75 KASAPI 258
76 BUTIL 13,457
77 NELFFI 3,383
78 PEP 294
79 PM 4,266
80 PMAP 1,263
81 PBA 1,077
82 SM 77
83 SANLAKAS 1,184
84 SPI 2,244
85 SUARA 3,611
86 SB 582
87 BANTAY 6,023
88 TUCP 2,013
89 UMDJ 262
90 UNI-MAD 7,318
91 VFP 7,718
92 YACAP 9,879
93 LYPAD 499

PARTYLIST CANVASS REPORT No. 5 (Page 1)

PARTYLIST CANVASS REPORT No. 5 (Page 1)
As of May 19, 2007 – 6:00 PM

1 1-UTAK 1,347
2 AA-KASOSYO 92
3 AT 1,780
4 ABAKADA 2,251
5 ABANSE! PINAY 448
6 ABA ILONGGO 912
7 ABONO 1,103
8 ADD-TRIBAL 201
9 ADD 262
10 A TEACHER 9,494
11 ASAHAN MO 767
12 AGBIAG! 1,026
13 AGING PINOY 844
14 AGAP 1,035
15 AHON 2,447
16 AHONBAYAN 400
17 APOI 3,231
18 AKBAYAN 5,925
19 AKSA 490
20 ALAGAD 16,832
21 ABAY PARAK 271
22 ABC 1,777
23 ANAD 472
24 AAWAS 72
25 ANC 409
26 APO 667
27 ARC 8,527
28 VENDORS 964
29 AVE 7,545
30 ATS 329
31 ALMANA 372
32 AKAPIN 665
33 AGHAM 822
34 ASAP 600
35 ABA-AKO 2,487
36 AN WARAY 1,691
37 AMIN 1,060
38 ANAKPAWIS 8,367
39 BANDILA 10,787
40 AG 233
41 ALIF 856
42 A SMILE 2,124
43 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 547
44 ANAK 1,393
45 ABS 291
46 AMANG 463
47 ASSALAM 843
48 AAPS 382
49 APEC 18,447
50 BABAE KA 804
51 BAGO 912
52 BATAS 3,084
53 BT, 353
54 BAHANDI 229
55 BANAT 623
56 BAYAN MUNA 14,101
57 BIGKIS 665
58 BP 99
59 BIYAYANG BUKID 302
60 BUHAY 25,599
61 CIBAC 19,059
62 SENIOR CITIZENS 6,409
63 COCOFED 403
64 GRECON 184
65 COOP-NATCCO 3,386
66 DIWA 3,200
67 FPJPM 6,562
68 GABRIELA 16,847
69 HAPI 112
70 KABATAAN 3,178
71 BUKLOD FILIPINA 113
72 KALAHI 1,071
73 KAKUSA 1,443
74 ANG KASANGGA 330
75 KASAPI 85
76 BUTIL 7,559
77 NELFFI 195
78 PEP 158
79 PM 2,267
80 PMAP 770
81 PBA 660
82 SM 46
83 SANLAKAS 672
84 SPI 399
85 SUARA 31
86 SB 119
87 BANTAY 3,158
88 TUCP 1,430
89 UMDJ 161
90 UNI-MAD 1,750
91 VFP 2,124
92 YACAP 1,382
93 LYPAD 157

Page 2

1 1-UTAK 1,347
2 AA-KASOSYO 92
3 AT 1,780
4 ABAKADA 2,251
5 ABANSE! PINAY 448
6 ABA ILONGGO 912
7 ABONO 1,103
8 ADD-TRIBAL 201
9 ADD 262
10 A TEACHER 9,494
11 ASAHAN MO 767
12 AGBIAG! 1,026
13 AGING PINOY 844
14 AGAP 1,035
15 AHON 2,447
16 AHONBAYAN 400
17 APOI 3,231
18 AKBAYAN 5,925
19 AKSA 490
20 ALAGAD 16,832
21 ABAY PARAK 271
22 ABC 1,777
23 ANAD 472
24 AAWAS 72
25 ANC 409
26 APO 667
27 ARC 8,527
28 VENDORS 964
29 AVE 7,545
30 ATS 329
31 ALMANA 372
32 AKAPIN 665
33 AGHAM 822
34 ASAP 600
35 ABA-AKO 2,487
36 AN WARAY 1,691
37 AMIN 1,060
38 ANAKPAWIS 8,367
39 BANDILA 10,787
40 AG 233
41 ALIF 856
42 A SMILE 2,124
43 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 547
44 ANAK 1,393
45 ABS 291
46 AMANG 463
47 ASSALAM 843
48 AAPS 382
49 APEC 18,447
50 BABAE KA 804
51 BAGO 912
52 BATAS 3,084
53 BT, 353
54 BAHANDI 229
55 BANAT 623
56 BAYAN MUNA 14,101
57 BIGKIS 665
58 BP 99
59 BIYAYANG BUKID 302
60 BUHAY 25,599
61 CIBAC 19,059
62 SENIOR CITIZENS 6,409
63 COCOFED 403
64 GRECON 184
65 COOP-NATCCO 3,386
66 DIWA 3,200
67 FPJPM 6,562
68 GABRIELA 16,847
69 HAPI 112
70 KABATAAN 3,178
71 BUKLOD FILIPINA 113
72 KALAHI 1,071
73 KAKUSA 1,443
74 ANG KASANGGA 330
75 KASAPI 85
76 BUTIL 7,559
77 NELFFI 195
78 PEP 158
79 PM 2,267
80 PMAP 770
81 PBA 660
82 SM 46
83 SANLAKAS 672
84 SPI 399
85 SUARA 31
86 SB 119
87 BANTAY 3,158
88 TUCP 1,430
89 UMDJ 161
90 UNI-MAD 1,750
91 VFP 2,124
92 YACAP 1,382
93 LYPAD 157

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