14 party-list groups on track to winning seats

05/22/2007 | 08:27 PM
Fourteen party-list groups led by Buhay, backed by Mike Velarde of the Catholic charismatic group El Shaddai, remained on course to win seats in the House of Representatives, based on the Commission on Elections’ partial official tally as of 6 p.m., Tuesday.

Buhay was on top with 559,410 votes or 7.9 percent of the 7,078,491 party-list votes that the Comelec had so far counted.

Militant party-list group Bayan Muna got the second-highest number of votes at 475,215 or 6.7 percent.

Getting 6 percent or more of the party-list votes entitles a group to three seats in the House of Representatives.

Two party-list groups – Cibac (342,961 votes or 4.9 percent) and APEC (298,815 or 4.2 percent) – received at least 4 percent of party-list votes, which would give them two seats each.

Ten organizations got at least 2 percent of party-list votes, which would give them one seat each, including Gabriela (278,759 votes or 3.9 percent), Butil (276,821 or 3.9 percent), A Teacher (264,932 or 3.7 percent), Alagad (257,841 or 3.6 percent), Coop-Natco (220,262 or 3.1 percent), Akbayan (204,253 or 2.9 percent), ARC (200,592 or 2.9 percent), An Waray (191,577 or 2.7 percent), Batas (187,724 or 2.6 percent), and Anakpawis (177583 or 2.5 percent).

The Comelec partial tally also showed that 79 other party-list groups have not met the minimum 2 percent.

In addition to more than 200 Representatives voted at the district level, there can be a maximum of 50 party-list seats in the House although only about half are typically filled following elections. -Amita Legaspi, GMANews.TV

Bets asked: Clean up your mess

Bets asked: Clean up your mess
By Jeffrey M. Tupas
Inquirer
Last updated 06:04am (Mla time) 05/20/2007
DAVAO CITY, Philippines—Behind every poster bearing the faces of candidates, is the bleeding environment, an environmental group said.

Maria Josephine Quianzon, vice chairperson of the environmental group Panaghoy sa Kinaiyahan-Coalition for Mother Earth (Panaghoy), said the candidates failed to raise their campaign into a level that is friendly both to the people and the environment.

“We saw how they invested millions of pesos just for their posters and handbills. The mass production of these materials was already alarming for the environmentalists because we know that it meant environmental destruction,” Quianzon said.

Now that the election is almost over, she said they were dismayed at what the country has become because of the elections: “A huge garbage bin.”

With this, she said, candidates must not only clean up their mess, those elected must make up for the damage that they caused the environment, for all the plastic posters, papers and gasoline that they used during the campaign, by pushing for environmental legislation and programs during their term.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources reported in 2002 that the country’s forest areas have been reduced from 21 million hectares in 1990 to six million in 1996.

“We are saddened and at the same time dismayed by what we now see around us. Tons and tons of election paraphernalia are left in the open to rot or to clog the already problematic drainage systems,” Quianzon said.

“Many years ago, it was said that a ton of a recycled paper will save at least 17 trees and the figures are changing. But the issue here is that the environment is being hurt badly by the desire of politicians to be put to office,” she said.

She also criticized the candidates’ use of plastic posters that do not decompose.

Quianzon said that nailing of campaign materials on trees inflict injury to the trees, which could eventually cause its death.

The country’s fair elections act prohibits posting of election materials on trees and on areas outside the designated common posters area. However, as the campaign period intensified, this was defied by the candidates who allowed their materials to be posted on trees, electric posts, and public structures.

A Davao-based coalition of various environmental people’s organizations and nongovernment organizations, Panaghoy has been fighting against oppressive developments like mining, genetically modified organisms, monoculture form of agriculture, among others.

Two of its advocacies are the protection of the watersheds of Davao and the promotion of organic agriculture.

inquirer.net

Latest Namfrel tally: 8-2-2 for GO

Latest Namfrel tally: 8-2-2 for GO

INQUIRER.net
Last updated 11:32pm (Mla time) 05/20/2007
MANILA, Philippines — Partial, unofficial tally of the National Movement for Free Elections as of 8:22 p.m. Sunday, covering 84,876 of 224,748 precincts (37.76 percent):

1. Loren Legarda (GO) — 5,633,410

2. Francis Escudero (GO) — 5,504,222

3. Panfilo Lacson (GO) — 4,861,789

4. Manuel Villar (GO) — 4,607,874

5. Francis Pangilinan (Ind) — 4,498,689

6. Benigno Aquino III (GO) — 4,409,844

7. Edgardo Angara (TU) — 4,018,899

8. Joker Arroyo (TU) — 3,680,216

9. Gregorio Honasan (Ind) — 3,672,038

10. Allan Peter Cayetano (GO) — 3,520,542

11. Antonio, Trillanes IV (GO) — 3,453,958

12. Aquilino Pimentel III (GO) — 3,383,080

Originally posted 10:09pm, Maila Ager, Alexander Villafaniain.jpg

Maguindanao polls took place, says watchdog

By Nash Maulana
Mindanao Bureau
Last updated 04:59pm (Mla time) 05/20/2007
COTABATO CITY, Philippines — Elections took place in Maguindanao, said a volunteer group, which is working with the National Movement for Free Elections (Namfrel) and the Church-based Parish Pastoral Council for Responsible Voting (PPCRV)

Romy Guiamel, chair of the Citizens’ Action for Responsible Elections (Care), issued the statement in response to claims by the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) and concerned sectors that no elections were held in the province.

He said residents of Maguindanao trooped to their polling precincts on Election Day and cast their votes. “Many people trooped to their precincts to cast their votes. There were elections in Maguindanao and we knew it took place because we have volunteers in the province,” he said.

The MILF and concerned individuals told the Philippine Daily Inquirer that balloting did not actually take place in many parts of the province.

The reports surfaced when results showed that it was 12-0 for TEAM Unity in Maguindanao, with Luis Singson topping the list.

Re-electionist Governor Andal Ampatuan’s slate was unopposed in all but one Maguindanao town.

Norie Unas, Ampatuan’s spokesperson, explained that there was nothing unusual in the TU sweep.

Unas said that among Muslims, the decision of the leader was highly respected.

In this case, Unas said Ampatuan supported TU senatorial candidates after conducting shura or consultation with the people.

He said the choice was respected by the voters because Ampatuan was both governor and spiritual leader to the Maguindanaoans.

Guiamel said his group was able to monitor the conduct of elections in Maguindanao — which was generally peaceful — because it fielded volunteers all over the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM).

He said the fielding of the volunteers was in cooperation with Namfrel and PPCRV.

Guiamel admitted that Namfrel volunteers failed to secure the sixth copy of the election returns as earlier claimed by the Comelec-accredited watchdog.

But he blamed this on the alleged lack of coordination between volunteers and the Comelec.

Guiamel said Namfrel volunteers failed to secure their ER copies all over the region.in.jpg

Canvass, proclamations over in 41 provinces, 697 towns

By Veronica Uy
in.jpg
Last updated 05:02pm (Mla time) 05/19/2007

MANILA, Philippines — Field offices of the Commission on Elections (Comelec) have finished the canvass of votes in 41 provinces, according to the poll body’s latest report on local elections.

Director Aldolfo Ibanez, head of the Comelec special action center, said the following provinces have already reported the completion of canvassing and proclamation: Apayao, Benguet, Ifugao, and Mountain Province in the Cordillera Administrative Region;

Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sur, and La Union in Region I; Batanes and Quirino in Region II; Aurora, Tarlac, Zambales, and Pampanga in Region III; Batangas, Marinduque, Occidental Mindoro, Oriental Mindoro, Palawan, and Romblon in Region IV; Camarines Sur, Catanduanes, and Sorsogon in Region V; Aklan, Guimaras, and Negros Occidental in Region VI;

Bohol, Cebu, Negros Oriental, and Siquijor in Region VII; Biliran, Leyte, Southern Leyte, and Eastern Samar in Region VIII; Zamboanga Sibugay in Region IX; Camiguin and Lanao Del Norte in Region X; Compostela Valley, Davao Del Norte, and Davao Oriental in Region XI; Sarangani in Region XII; and Sulu in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao.

In an earlier report, he referred to the information submitted to him by regional election directors, who said canvassing has been completed and proclamations have been made in 697 towns.

The 697 include those in Malabang and Calanogas in Lanao Del Sur; San Isidro, Tayum, Lagayan, Villaviciosa, Danglas, and Penarubia in Abra; Pudtol, Santa Marcela, and Flora in Apayao; Tublya, Buguias, Kapangan, and Sablan in Benguet; Hungduan and Lagawe in Ifugao; Besao, Sabangan, Sagada, and Sadanga in Mountain Province;

Carasi, Dumalneg, Burgos, Nueva Era, Bangui, Sarrat, Pinili, Vintar, Paoay, Banna, San Nicolas, Pasuquin, Adams, Pagudpud, Badoc, Marcos, Solsona, Laoag City, Batac, Piddig, Bacarra, and Currimao in Ilocos Norte;

San Vicente, Nagbukel, Magsingal, Lidlidda, San Ildefonso, Santa Catalina, Sigay, Gregorio Del Pilar, Galimuyod, Suyo, Banayoyo, Quirino, Alilem, Santa Lucia, San Juan, Santo Domingo, Santiago, Caoayan, San Emilio, Santa Cruz, Sugpon, Santa, Cabugao, Tagudin, Sinait, Santa Maria, and Vigan City in Ilocos Sur;

Burgos, San Gabriel, Pugo, Santol, Bangar, Bagulin, Bacnotan, Luna, Balaoan, Aringay, San Juan, Caba, Sudipen, Santo Tomas, Tubao, Naguilian, San Fernando City, Agoo, Bauang, and Rosario in La Union;

Santo Tomas, Natividad, Anda, Ubiztondo, San Jacinto, Laoac, Burgos, Mabini, Infanta, Alcala, San Fabian, Agno, Bautista, Bugallon, Bolinao, Urdaneta City, Santa Maria, Sison, Mapandan, Mangaldan, Binalonan, San Quintin, Tayug, Sual, San Manuel, Balungao, Labrador, San Nicolas, Santa Barbara, Aguilar, Basista, Pozorrubio, Bani, Dasol, Asingan, Malasiqui, Binmaley, Rosales, and Villasis in Pangasinan.

Quirino, Maconacon, Quezon, San Guillermo, San Pablo, Reina Mercedes, and Santo Tomas in Isabela; Dipaculao, Baler, Casiguran, Dinalungan, Maria Aurora, Dilasag, and Dingalan in Aurora; Morong, Pilar, Samal, Dinalupihan, Limay, Abucay, Hermosa, and Orion in Bataan;

Pandi, Paombong, Calumpit, Hagonoy, and Angat in Bulacan; Santo Domingo in Nueva Ecija; San Clemente in Tarlac; Santa Teresita and Mataas na Kahoy in Batangas; Magallanes, Ternate, Noveleta, Carmona, Amadeo, Naic, Gen. Mariano Alvarez, Gen. Trias, Mendez-Nunez, Maragondon, Indang, Alfonso, Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo, and Cavite City in Cavite.

Victoria in Laguna; Mogpog, Buenavista, Torrijos, Gasan, Boac, and Santa Cruz in Marinduque; Rizal, Paluan, Sablayan, Calintaan, and Abra De Ilog in Occidental Mindoro; Naujan in Oriental Mindoro;

Sofronio Espanola and Cagayancillo in Palawan; Alcantara, Banton, Santa Maria, San Jose, San Agustin, Ferrol, Magdiwang, and Calatrava in Romblon; Aurora, Molave, Mahayag, Dumalinao, Lakewood, and Labangan in Zamboanga Del Sur; Diplahan, Imelda, Siay, and Talusan in Zamboanga Sibugay; Camaligan in Camarines Sur;

Madalag, Makato, Balite, Malinao, Numancia, Altavas, Batan, and Kalibo in Aklan; Sebaste, Libertad, San Jose, Bugasong, Barbasa, and Anini-y in Antique;

Dumalag, Jamindan, Cuartero, Pilar, Sapian, Pontevedra, Dao, Panitan, and President Roxas in Capiz; San Lorenzo and Sibunag in Guimaras; Tubungan, Batad, Lemery, San Rafael, Concepcion, Balasan, Zarraga, Guimbal, San Miguel, and Bingawan in Iloilo;

Candoni, Salvador Benedicto, and San Enrique in Negros Occidental; and Alicia, Anda, Antequera, Baclayon, Balilihan, Batuan, Bien Unido, Bilar, Buenavista, Calape, and Candijay in Bohol.

Party List,As of May 18, 2007 – 6:00 PM, COMELEC

1 APOI 1,126

2  GABRIELA 676

3 BAYAN MUNA 490

4 CIBAC 477

5 AKBAYAN 382

6 ANAKPAWIS 338

7 YACAP 315

8 A TEACHER 253

9 ABA ILONGGO 224

10 APO 201

11 KALAHI 201

12 ABAKADA 187

13 AHON 185

14 AGBIAG! 183

15 ABA-AKO 165

16 A SMILE 155

17 AGHAM 145

18 ASAHAN MO 134

19         FPJPM 126

20 AT 118

21 BANDILA 117

22 SENIOR CITIZENS 117

23 BUHAY 116

24 AGAP 105

25 ABANSE! PINAY 101

26 AMIN 98

27 ASAP 92

28 ALMANA 91

29 PMAP 80

30 UNI-MAD 79

31 AHONBAYAN 75

32 BUTIL 67

33 ANAD 59

34 BANTAY 59

35 COCOFED 58

36 KABATAAN 58 3

7 AVE 55

38 AKSA 53

39 AN WARAY46

40 PM45

41 TUCP 45

42 ANAK 44

43 BATAS 43

44 AKAPIN 42

45 AG 42

46 SANLAKAS 38

47 VENDORS 37

48 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 34

49 ALAGAD 32

50 PBA 32

51 ADD-TRIBAL 31

52 1-UTAK 29

53 BABAE KA 29

54 LYPAD 29

55 AGING PINOY 27

56 APEC 27

57 VFP 25

58 KAKUSA 24

59 ABONO 23

60 ARC 23

61 ABS 23

62 COOP-NATCCO 22

63 UMDJ 22

64 ADD 19

65 PEP 18

66 SPI 18

67 ALIF 17

68 ASSALAM 17

69 DIWA 17

70 ABC 16

71 ATS 15

72 AMANG 15

73 BAHANDI 14

74 BANAT 13

75 AAPS 12

76 BT, 10

77 ABAY PARAK 9

78 BP 9

79 BUKLOD FILIPINA 9

80 SUARA 8

81 HAPI 7

82 NELFFI 7

83 AA-KASOSYO 5

84 BIGKIS 5

85 BIYAYANG BUKID 4

86 KASAPI 4

87 ANG KASANGGA 3

88 SB 3

89 SM 2

90 AAWAS 1

91 ANC 1

92 GRECON 1

93 BAGO 0

Party List

Party List

Saturday, May 19, 2007

1:18:48 PM

Name    Votes

BUHAY     20,965

ALAGAD     14,907

BAYAN MUNA     13,178

CIBAC     10,875

AGHAM     10,371

GABRIELA     9,062

AKBAYAN     6,665

1-UTAK     6,276

ANAKPAWIS     6,233

BATAS     5,571

FPJPM     5,391

SENIOR CITIZENS     4,677

A TEACHER     3,740

VFP     3,131

AKSA     3,001

COCOFED     2,636

KABATAAN     2,228

ARC     2,023

HAPI     1,905

ABAKADA     1,889

SANLAKAS     1,573

ANAK     1,572

AGAP     1,558

BANTAY     1,509

DIWA     1,405

KAKUSA     1,366

ABC     1,142

ABA-AKO     1,086

BUKLOD FILIPINA     1,026

PMAP     1,008

ASAP     893

ALMANA     849

PBA     846

AHON     846

AVE     811

BANAT     790

APOI     782

PM     780

APEC     733

ANC     684

AKAPIN     656

AT     644

TUCP     642

BIYAYANG BUKID     494

YACAP     484

ABS     470

BUTIL     456

UNI-MAD     438

SPI     438

BANDILA     431

BABAE KA     421

BTM     403

ASAHAN MO     397

AHONBAYAN     372

VENDORS     369

AMANG     367

ABA ILONGGO     365

ANAD     358

AA-KASOSYO     356

AANGAT KA PILIPINO     352

AG     349

ABAY PARAK     338

AMIN     321

BP     315

AN WARAY     310

KALAHI     299

AGBIAG     281

LYPAD     273

BAGO     260

ANG KASANGGA     258

BIGKIS     253

UMDJ     250

ABANSE! PINAY     237

ATS     233

ABONO     196

ALIF     190

COOP-NATCCO     185

A SMILE     184

APO     167

SM     162

SB     158

AAPS     148

AGING PINOY     139

ADD     126

SUARA     124

AAWAS     117

GRECON     106

NELFFI     105

KASAPI     78

ADD-TRIBAL     66

BAHANDI     63

ASSALAM     46

Party List (Batch 2)

1 APOI 509

2 GABRIELA 395

3 BAYAN MUNA 284

4 AKBAYAN 261

5 CIBAC 220

6 ANAKPAWIS 185

7 A TEACHER 164

8 YACAP 163

9 ABAKADA 124

10 ABA ILONGGO 123

11 AHON 111

12 AGHAM 108

13 KALAHI 92

14 APO 86

15 A SMILE 86

16 AT 85

17 ASAHAN MO 85

18 SENIOR CITIZENS 76

19 ABA-AKO 75

20 AGBIAG! 74

21 ABANSE! PINAY 65

22 BANDILA 65

23 FPJPM 55

24 AGAP 52

25 AMIN 50

26 BUHAY 48

27 ASAP 47

28 UNI-MAD 47

29 ALMANA 46

30 PMAP 42

31 ANAD 37

32 AHONBAYAN 36

33 AVE 36

34 KABATAAN 35

35 COCOFED 34

36 AKAPIN 33

37 AN WARAY 32

38 AG 29

39 TUCP 28

40 BUTIL 27

41 PBA 27

42 BATAS 25

43 BANTAY 23

44 BABAE KA 22

45 ANAK 21

46 SANLAKAS 21

47 AKSA 20 48 LYPAD 20

49 ALAGAD 19

50 1-UTAK 17 51 ABS 17

52 COOP-NATCCO 17 53 PM 17

54 AGING PINOY 16

55 ABONO 15

56 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 15

57 ARC 14

58 UMDJ 14

59 VFP 14

60 ADD-TRIBAL 13

61 VENDORS 13

62 KAKUSA 13

63 SPI 13 6

4 AMANG 12

65 ASSALAM `12

66 BAHANDI 12

67 APEC 10

68 PEP 10

69 ADD 9

70 ABC 9

71 DIWA 9

72 BANAT 8

73 ABAY PARAK 7 74 BT,

7 75 ATS 6

76 ALIF 6

77 BP 6

78 SUARA 6

79 AAPS 5

80 BUKLOD FILIPINA 5

81 AA-KASOSYO 4

82 HAPI 3

83 ANG KASANGGA 3 84 BIGKIS 2

85 BIYAYANG BUKID 2

86 NELFFI 2

87 KASAPI 1

Party List

1 APOI 112

2 GABRIELA 100

3 BAYAN MUNA 64

4 CIBAC 59

5

AKBAYAN 49

6 ANAKPAWIS 45

7 AT 37

8 APO 29

9 ABA ILONGGO 28

10 A TEACHER 25

11 YACAP 25

12 ABAKADA 24

13 AGHAM 21

14 SENIOR CITIZENS 21

15 ABANSE! PINAY 18

16 AGBIAG! 17 1

7 AMIN 16

18 AHON 13

19 TUCP 13

20 A SMILE 11

21 AKAPIN 10

22 ASAP 10

23 BUHAY 10

24 ALAGAD 9

25 AVE 9

26 BANDILA 9

27 COCOFED 9

28 KABATAAN 9

29 KALAHI 9

30 ALMANA 8

31 FPJPM 8

32 AGAP 7

33 ANAD 7 3

4 AG 7

35 ANAK 7

36 BABAE KA 7

37 COOP-NATCCO 7

38 ASAHAN MO 6

39 ABA-AKO 6

40 BUTIL 6

41 PM 6

42 PBA 6

43 UNI-MAD 6

44 AHONBAYAN 5

45 AN WARAY 5

46 AMANG 5

47 BATAS 5

48 ATS 4

49 AANGAT KA PILIPINO 4

50 BANAT 4

51 SANLAKAS 4

52 LYPAD 4

53 1-UTAK 3

54 ADD-TRIBAL 3

55 ABC 3

56 ABS 3

57 KAKUSA 3

58 PMAP 3 5

9 VFP 3

60 ABONO 2

61 ADD 2

62 AGING PINOY 2

63 AKSA 2

64 ABAY PARAK 2

65 ARC 2

66 VENDORS 2

67 SPI 2

68 BANTAY 2

69 ASSALAM 1

70 APEC 1

71 BP 1

72 BIYAYANG BUKID 1

73 BUKLOD FILIPINA 1

74 NELFFI 1

75 AA-KASOSYO 0

76 AAWAS 0

77 ANC 0

78 ALIF 0

79 AAPS 0

80 BAGO 0 81 BT, 0

82 BAHANDI 0

83 BIGKIS 0

84 GRECON 0

85 DIWA 0

86 HAPI 0

87 ANG KASANGGA 0

88 KASAPI 0

89 PEP 0

90 SM 0

91 SUARA 0

92 SB 0

93 UMDJ 0

Senator Batch 2

1 PANGILINAN, Francis N. 5,120

2 LEGARDA, Loren B. 4,720

3 AQUINO, Benigno Simeon III C. 4,333

4 RECTO, Ralph G. 4,184

5 VILLAR, Manuel, Jr. B. 4,089

6 ESCUDERO, Francis Joseph G. 3,849

7 ARROYO, Joker P. 3,497

8 LACSON, Panfilo M. 3,273

9 ANGARA, Edgardo J. 3,219

10 CAYETANO, Allan Peter S. 3,145

11 PIMENTEL, Aquilino L. 3,114

12 ROCO, Sonia M. 2,767

13 DEFENSOR, Michael T. 2,671

14 ZUBIRI, Juan Miguel 2,429

15 SOTTO, Vicente III C. 2,264

16 HONASAN, Gregorio B. 2,190

17 MAGSAYSAY, Vicente P. 2,045

18 OSMEÑA, John Henry R. 1,972

19 TRILLANES, Antonio IV F 1,799

20 COSETENG, Anna Dominique M. 1,794

21 MONTANO, Cesar 1,585

22 PICHAY, Prospero, Jr. A. 1,278

23 GOMEZ, Richard I. 1,065

24 SINGSON, Luis C. 1,002

25 ORETA, Teresa Tao A 944

26 BAUTISTA, Martin D 711

27 PAREDES, Zosimo Jesus II M. 606

28 CAYETANO, Joselito P. 540

29 SISON, Adrian O. 457

30 WOOD, Victor R. 432

31 CHAVEZ, Melchor G. 411

32 KIRAM, Jamalul D 376

33 LOZANO, Oliver O. 267

34 ESTRELLA, Antonio L. 190

35 CANTAL, Felix C. 156

36 ENCISO, Ruben C 99 3

7 ORPILLA, Euardo F. 98

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